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Tuesday 1:00 PM-2:45 PM

Rebecca W. Watson was the Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management at the Department of the Interior. In this position she had administrative and managerial responsibility for the Bureau of Land Management, the Minerals Management Service and the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement. Before joining the top ranks of the Bush Administration, Ms. Watson was a managing partner with the Helena, Montana law firm of Gough, Shanahan, Johnson & Waterman. While there she was actively involved with many natural resource, environmental, and government relations issues. During the George H.W. Bush Administration, she was appointed as Assistant General Counsel for energy policy at the Department of Energy. Ms. Watson has lectured and written extensively on a wide variety of environmental topics including the Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act, cultural resources, and access to public lands. As a Westerner, Ms. Watson has a keen interest in the federal government's land management rules and regulations and their affect on local communities. She has served on various interdisciplinary groups including the Public Lands Committee, American Bar Association and the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation. She earned a J.D. in 1978 from the University of Denver and a M.A. in 1975 also from the University of Denver. She is admitted to the bars of Wyoming, Colorado, District of Columbia, Montana, Ninth and Tenth Circuit, U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and U.S. Supreme Court.

Pam Inmann is Executive Director of the Western Governors' Association. She became the Executive Director of the Western Governors' Association in March 2004. Ms. Inmann previously worked as the District Director in State Government Affairs at Altria Corporate Services. Altria is the parent company of Philip Morris USA and Kraft Foods, Inc. As District Director, Ms. Inmann had responsibility for fifteen western states with three regional directors reporting to her. Prior to joining Altria, Ms. Inmann worked for ten years for the Rocky Mountain Oil and Gas Association. At RMOGA she served as Director of Special Projects and Director of the Committee on Oil Shale. Her other experience includes public affairs manager at Cyprus-Amoco Minerals' Hansen Project and assistant coordinator and consultant to the Colorado Governor's office. Ms. Inmann sat on the foundation board of the National Conference of State Legislators and was former President of the Colorado Public Expenditure Council. She is a graduate of the University of Colorado in Boulder in 1975 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science.

Governor Bill Owens was sworn in as Colorado's 40th Governor in January 1999. He was re-elected in 2002 with the greatest majority in Colorado history, earning a broad mandate for his innovative leadership. Under the state's term-limits law, Owens will serve until his successor takes the oath of office in January 2007.

During his tenure, Gov. Owens pushed through the largest tax relief package in state history, amounting to $1 billion in cuts in rates of sales, personal-income, and capital-gains taxes, and an elimination of the marriage penalty. As a result, he has won high marks for his fiscal leadership, earning the highest grade among the nation's governors from the Cato Institute.

Touted as one of the major emerging leaders in American politics by The Economist magazine, Owens also was identified as one of the country's Top Ten rising political stars by syndicated columnist Robert Novak. In 2002, National Review magazine called Bill Owens "the best governor in America."

Bill Owens is the immediate past-Chairman of the Western Governors' Association and is a past-Chairman of the Republican Governors' Association and the Natural Resources Committee of the National Governors' Association. Owens is a member of the Board of Governors of Young America's Foundation, which owns and runs the Reagan Ranch in Santa Barbara, California.

Keeping his promise to institute sweeping school reform in Colorado, Gov. Owens created an education accountability system - including detailed, online school report cards - that U.S. Education Secretary Rod Paige has called "the envy of the nation." His accountability system has been praised as among the best in the nation by Education Week magazine and the Heritage Foundation. He combined this model education accountability plan with six consecutive years of full state funding for K-12 public education. Under Owens' leadership, Colorado became the first state in the nation to send students to college with vouchers in 2004. The College Opportunity Fund replaced block subsidies to colleges or universities with individual stipends for students to use at the school of their choice.

Gov. Owens kept his commitment to transform Colorado's transportation system, which had been neglected for nearly a quarter century. Through TRANS (Transportation Revenue Anticipation Notes), an innovative financing program, he accelerated $1.7 billion in transportation projects statewide that would have taken up to half a century to complete - projects that will now be done in a decade without an increase in taxes.

Known as one of Colorado's most effective policy makers, Bill Owens served in the State House of Representatives for six years and the State Senate for six years. He also served four years as Colorado Treasurer. He authored landmark legislation creating charter schools, toughening prison sentences, modernizing child abuse statutes and reforming the tort system. He is a leading advocate of the Colorado Taxpayers' Bill of Rights (TABOR), which caps government spending and requires that excess funds be returned to state taxpayers. 

Gov. Owens, who holds a master's degree in public administration from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, worked for 20 years in the private sector. The Governor is an expert on Soviet affairs and writes and lectures often on Russia.

Secretary Gale Norton , a lifelong conservationist, public servant and advocate for bringing common sense solutions to environmental policy, was sworn in as the 48th Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior in January 2001. The first woman to head the 156-year-old department, Norton has made what she calls the Four C's the cornerstone of her tenure: Communication, Consultation, and Cooperation, all in the service of Conservation. At the heart of the Four C's is the belief that for conservation to be successful, the government must involve the people who live and work on the land.

To implement the Four C's approach, Norton has reached out to states, tribes, local communities, businesses, conservation organizations, and private citizens in a variety of ways, including: New Landowner Incentive and Private Stewardship Grant programs, providing cost-share grants to states and landowners for wildlife conservation; The Cooperative Conservation Initiative, a proposal for cost-share grants to empower states and local landowners to engage in conservation projects on public and private lands; Strong support of the bipartisan plan to restore the Florida Everglades; Reduction of long-standing maintenance backlogs on the National Park Service and the National Wildlife Refuge System, including a proposed record budget increase for the refuge system; Support for environmentally sensitive energy production on public lands, including renewable sources such as geothermal, wind, biomass and solar.

Norton has made building cooperation and consensus the focus of her nearly 27-year career. From 1991 to 1999, she served as Attorney General of Colorado. In that capacity, she represented virtually every agency of the Colorado state government. She argued cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and other appellate courts and testified numerous times before congressional committees. As a negotiator of the $206 billion national tobacco settlement, Norton represented Colorado and 45 other states as part of the largest lawsuit settlement in history.

Prior to her election as Attorney General, Norton served in Washington, D.C. as Associate Solicitor of the U.S. Department of the Interior, overseeing endangered species and public lands legal issues for the National Park Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service. She also worked as Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Agriculture and, from 1979 to 1983, as a Senior Attorney for the Mountain States Legal Foundation.

Norton graduated magna cum laude from the University of Denver in 1975 and earned her law degree with honors from the same university in 1978. Before becoming Interior Secretary, Norton was senior counsel at Brownstein, Hyatt & Farber, P.C.

Under Secretary Mark Rey was sworn in as the under secretary for natural resources and environment by Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman on October 2, 2001. In that position, he oversees the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service. Since January 1995, Rey served as a staff member with the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. He was the lead staff person for the committee's work on national forest policy and Forest Service administration. He was directly involved in virtually all of the forestry and conservation legislation considered during the past several sessions of Congress, with principal responsibility for a number of public lands bills during this period. In addition, he worked on the Herger/Feinstein Quincy Library Act of 1998 and the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000. This latter law is considered to have been the most extensive public forestry legislation passed by Congress in 20 years. From 1992-94 Rey served as vice president, forest resources for the American Forest and Paper Association. He served as executive director for the American Forest Resource Alliance from 1989-92. He served as vice president, public forestry programs for the National Forest Products Association from 1984-89. From 1976-84 he served in several positions for the American Paper Institute/National Forest Products Association, a consortium of national trade associations. From 1974-75 he worked as a staff assistant for the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management in Billings, Montana, and Washington, D.C. Rey is a native of Canton, Ohio. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in wildlife management, a Bachelor of Science degree in forestry, and a Master of Science degree in natural resources policy and administration, all from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Tuesday 3:00 PM-3:45 PM

Stephen A. Smith , DVM, has been executive director of Southern Alliance for Clean Energy since 1993 and has actively worked with numerous non-profit organizations addressing energy, water, forest, air, nuclear weapons production and nuclear waste issues since 1982. Dr. Smith received a Doctorate in Veterinarian Medicine from the University of Tennessee (1992) and a B.S. in biology from Kentucky Wesleyan College (1988). In 2000, Dr. Smith’s environmental passions led him to set aside his veterinary practice to devote himself full time to Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. Currently, Dr. Smith serves as co-chair for the U.S. Climate Action Network board of directors; the national governing board of the Center for Resource Solutions’ National Green Power Accreditation; TVA's Green Power Marketing Committee where he chairs the Third-Party Certification workgroup; and Florida Power and Light’s Green Power public advisory committee. Some of Dr. Smith's experience includes testifying before various Commissions and Congress, serving two terms on TVA's Regional Resource Stewardship Council, and serving on the U. S. Department of Energy, Tennessee Valley Electric System Advisory Committee .

Tuesday 3:45 PM-5:30 PM

Dr. Mark Nechodom (pronounced nék-o-dum) is Director of Social and Policy Sciences at the Sierra Nevada Research Center in Davis, California, a multi-disciplinary research unit of the Pacific Southwest Research Station, USDA Forest Service. He served as the Senior Social Scientist for the Sierra Nevada Framework and led the social science team in the Lake Tahoe Basin Science Assessment. Before joining the Forest Service, he spent several years on the research faculty at the University of California, Davis, where he co-founded and directed the Land Use and Natural Resources program for resource management professionals. His research has focused on the institutional dynamics of environmental decision-making, and on the use of Life-Cycle Assessment for valuing ecosystem services. Dr. Nechodom spent several years as a consultant and researcher in Mexico and Latin America on agricultural and environmental policy, and is a Visiting Scholar and occasional lecturer at the University of California, Davis.

Frederick Tornatore is Vice President of Environmental Services and Technology TSS Consultants. He has over 30 years of professional experience in renewable energy development for both the private and public sectors. Much of this experience has been in assessing the environmental effects of development and utilization of renewable energy resources. Currently he is responsible for environmental evaluations of a wide number of existing and emerging technologies that use many different forms of biomass. Mr. Tornatore also has a long history of renewable energy legislative, regulatory, and policy analyses. While with the California Energy Commission, Mr. Tornatore implemented legislative mandates for renewable energy research and development. At TSS, he tracks and evaluates legislative mandates, regulatory requirements, policy developments, and executive orders that provide incentives to biomass energy development. Mr. Tornatore has a B.S. in Botany from the University of California at Berkeley, and he is a California Registered Environmental Assessor. He is currently Chairman of the Sacramento Environmental Commission.

“Review of State Level Efforts for Biomass Incentives”

Arthur “Butch” Blazer is a member of the Mescalero Apache Tribe, which is located on a diverse, 460,000 acre reservation located in south-central New Mexico. Prior to his appointment by Governor Richardson as State Forester in 2003, Blazer held the position of Director of Planning and Development for his Tribe, working on several economic and social initiatives, including the development of a tribal fish hatchery. He also served two consecutive terms on the Mescalero Tribal Council as the Treasurer for his People. Blazer carries a 27-year career with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to his position with state government. With the BIA, he served in the capacity of a Range Specialist, Natural Resources Manager, at both the agency and regional level, and as Agency Superintendent on the Ute Mountain Ute and Laguna Pueblo reservations. In 1983, he co-founded the Native American Fish & Wildlife Society (NAFWS), a non-profit organization now comprised of 230 member tribes and Alaskan villages; Blazer served as the President of NAFWS from 1997-2000. Recently, he was elected President of the newly established Southwestern Tribal Fisheries Commission, another non-profit that he helped to establish. A graduate of New Mexico State University, he received a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture in 1975. Butch remains active with the University, currently serving as Chairman of NMSU’s President’s Council on Native American Relations (PCNAR).

“Review of State Level Efforts for Biomass Incentives”

Edward E. Gray , P.E. is an owner and the president of ANTARES, a consulting engineering firm. Mr. Gray has had an active role in the development and implementation of biomass and solar energy projects for power generation for 25 years. ANTARES is actively developing projects for biomass co-firing in New York, Iowa, North Carolina, Virginia, and Massachusetts. He is also the principal engineer for a project collaborating with Eastman Chemical and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop and demonstrate the use of low temperature hydrothermal gasification for production of fuels and feedstocks. As part of his efforts working with the EPA, Department of Energy and Department of Agriculture for the National Bioenergy Initiative, he led the development of the Agripower model designed to examine a wide array of impacts for deployment of biomass power systems. Mr. Gray also led a team of experts to prepare an assessment of biomass power generation technologies for the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Mr. Gray is currently serving as the co-chair of the biomass power supply working group under the Clean Energy Development Advisory Council for the Western Governors. He has served as technical advisor to the Governor's Energy Task Force in the state of Maryland.

“WGA Clean and Diversified Energy Initiative and National Biomass State & Regional Partnership Policy Efforts”

John H. Ashworth , Ph.D. is the Team Leader of Partnership Development, National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Dr. Ashworth serves as the lead NREL point of contact for private firms, non-governmental groups, and other federal agencies wanting to work collaboratively with the National Bioenergy Center (NBC). Dr. Ashworth currently coordinates the efforts of the NREL research and engineering teams to make certain that biomass-related partnership activities are undertaken efficiently, that milestones and deliverables are met, and that DOE and the partner organization management are kept fully informed of progress, problems, and lessons learned. The NBC currently has major collaborative biorefinery projects underway with a number of forest products and agricultural processing firms and groups. Dr. Ashworth has more than 25 years of experience in the design and management of federally and privately-funded energy research and development projects. He has worked extensively with DOE senior management and contracting officers, both as a Washington, D.C.-based analytic support contractor manager and as an NREL researcher and industrial partnership leader. Before returning to NREL in 2001, he also founded and managed a firm that provided renewable energy consulting services for electric utilities and states in the Southwestern United States. Dr. Ashworth has also worked as a manager with a start up technology firm and has worked with state officials, rural development groups and biotechnology firms on a variety of renewable energy projects, ranging from remote photovoltaic systems to wind projects to ethanol plants.

“2005 Energy Bill”

Wednesday 8:00 AM.-8:30 AM

Drew Bolin is the Director of the Governor's Office of Energy Management and Conservation (OEMC). He and his office are working to help make “ Colorado the ‘ Saudi Arabia’ of renewable energy and alternative fuels.” As the lead state agency on energy efficiency, OEMC leverages private and public partnerships to demonstrate the use of anaerobic digesters, biofuels, fuel cells, geothermal applications, solar devices, microturbines, wind power, Stirling engines and other energy-related technology. The OEMC is well known for its strategic investments. Over the last two years the Office has made important energy endeavors that will position the State as an alternative energy economic hub. In 2005, the OEMC created the state’s “E85 Coalition” to promote the use of an 85 percent ethanol gasoline blend. Also last year, the OEMC provided $2 million in seed money for the Colorado Fuel Cell Research Center (CFCC) at the Colorado School of Mines (Mines). In 2004, the OEMC helped re-constitute the Colorado Energy Research Institute (CERI) at Mines. Before Gov. Owens named him OEMC Director, he served for four years as the state’s Director of Business Development covering 64 counties. Drew has been an international operations executive, a successful entrepreneur helping establish an international business school on three continents and a U.S. senate legislative aide in Washington, D.C. He teaches international graduate courses at night at the University of Denver and is a fourth-generation native. Last year, Drew was privately sponsored on a fact finding mission to study renewable energy and alternative fuels throughout Europe.

Wednesday 8:30 AM.-10:00 AM

Dr. Marcia Patton-Mallory currently works in the office of the Chief, USDA Forest Service, as the Biomass and Bio-energy Coordinator. Previous to this assignment, she was the Director of the Rocky Mountain Research Station of the USDA Forest Service, in Fort Collins, CO for five years, and Assistant Station Director for 10 years. Additional assignments with the USDA Forest Service include a Research Staff Specialists in the Washington Office and a Research Engineer at the Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, WI. Marcia’s technical training includes a B.S. in Wood Science and Technology from the College of Forestry and Natural Resources at Colorado State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the College of Engineering at Colorado State University. Special assignments include a Science and Technology Fellow, assigned to the U.S. Senate.

Bill Jones has served as Director of the Alabama Loggers Council since 1997; his responsibilities include logger training, transportation safety, and DOT compliance. Currently he serves on the Southern Alliance for Utilization of Biomass Resources, Board of the Wood Supply Research Institute, Utilization Committee, and the American Loggers Council. Mr. Jones participates in Alabama’s Log-A-Load for Kids that raised $280,000 in 2004 and over $4 million since 1995 to fund Children’s Health Intervention Protection Services and Children’s Hospitals of Alabama. He has forestry work experience with Pope-Jones Pulpwood Co., ST Joe Paper Company, Gulf States Paper Company, and Louisiana Pacific. He has worked as a Private Woodlands Coordinator with Alabama Forestry Association form 1981 to 1991. Mr. Jones completed forestry school at Auburn University in 1978. Bill is married to wife Rachel and the father of three children.

“ Hurricane Update: Lessons Learned From Hurricane and Other Catastrophic Events”

Elaine Zieroth has been Forest Supervisor of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Eastern Arizona since April 2003. Prior to coming to Arizona, she was Forest Supervisor of the Manti-La Sal National Forest in Utah for three years, and District Ranger in Bonners Ferry Idaho and Tonasket, Washington for over eight years. Elaine has also worked for the Forest Service and BLM in California and Colorado, as well as working in research. She has a B.A. in biology from the University of California at Davis, a M.A. in wildlife biology from California State University at Fresno and post graduate work in genetics at University of Iowa.

“ Stewardship Success Story in Arizona ”

Jamie Barbour earned BS in Botany from Washington State University (1979), and a MS (1983) and Ph.D. (1990) in Wood and Fiber Science from the University of Washington. He has worked for Weyerhaeuser’s Technology Center (1984-1986) and Forintek Canada Corp. (1986-1993) where he conducted research on the effects of different forest management practices on the physical properties of wood products. In 1993, he joined the Ecologically Sustainable Production of Forest Resources Team at the USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station where he conducted research on the interaction of ecological and economic objectives for forestry. From 1997 to 2002 he was team leader for that team. In April 2002, he became Program Manager for the Focused Science Delivery (FSD) Program also at the PNW Research Station. The FSD program helps policy makers, natural resource managers, and the public to more effectively use what is already known about natural resource management by conducting analyses of existing scientific information to address current and emerging issues in forest policy and management. Mr. Barbour is the author or coauthor of more than 90 scientific publications on natural resource management and use.

“Estimating accessible biomass volumes from fire hazard reduction and forest health improvement treatments in forests in the western United States”

Wednesday 10:30 AM-11:00 AM

Dr. John Shelly is currently a Cooperative Extension Advisor in Biomass and Forest Product Utilization at the University of California Forest Products Laboratory in Richmond, California. His primary area of interest and expertise is in the physical properties of wood and manufacturing technology with an emphasis on woody biomass, including underutilized urban and timber species. Current efforts are focused on the technology needed to wisely use these underutilized resources to enhance forest health and economic development. He is currently leading major research projects focused on the utilization potential of tanoak, an indigenous western hardwood species, small diameter trees, sudden oak death infected wood, and urban tree removals. John has authored over 50 scientific and extension publications and presented papers and talks at over 80 conferences and workshops. Mr. Shelly’s educational background is in Wood Science and Technology ( BS-- Penn State, MS and PhD - University of California at Berkeley). He has held academic extension positions since 1978 at UC Berkeley and the University of Kentucky.

Wednesday 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Paul Delong is Administrator of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Forestry and Wisconsin’s Chief State Forester. Paul directs and coordinates statewide forest policy, planning, and management for the forestry program, which consists of 460 permanent employees engaged in the protection and sustainable management of Wisconsin’s outstanding forest resources. Before being named Chief State Forester in 2003, Paul served five years as Deputy Chief State Forester. Prior to that Paul served as Chief of the Forestry Program Support Section and State Lands Specialist for Forestry. Before joining the Department in 1992, Paul worked as a senior program officer for World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C., prior to which he worked as a mediator for the RESOLVE Center for Environmental Dispute Resolution, also in Washington, D.C. Paul holds a bachelor's degree in forestry from the University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point and a master's degree in natural resource policy from the University of Michigan. Paul is married to his soul mate, Abby, and relishes time spent with her and their two children. Paul is a recovering punster who loves to keep falling off the wagon.

Phillip Badger is President of Renewable Oil International® LLC and ROI Alabama Operations LLC. He formerly worked for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) where he led fuel ethanol research programs for five years—including construction of a 10 gallon per hour fuel ethanol plant—and managed the U.S. Department of Energy’s 13-state Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP) for 15 years. Projects managed under the SERBEP program covered biomass resources studies, feasibility studies, feedstock and technology applied R&D, environmental and economic studies, and information transfer activities. Prior to TVA, Mr. Badger had research and extension responsibilities at Ohio State University in the fields of renewable energy and controlled environment agriculture. Mr. Badger has a B.S. and M.Sc. in Agricultural Engineering from the Ohio State University, an MBA from Vanderbilt University, and is a registered professional engineer in Ohio and Alabama. He serves on the boards of the Biomass Energy Research Association (BERA) and the New Uses Council (the trade association for the bioenergy and biobased products industries). He is also a member of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers, American Solar Energy Society, International Solar Energy Society, Association for the Advancement of Industrial Crops, Council on Forest Engineering, and Council for Agricultural Science and Technology.

A New Vision for Value Added Forestry”

Richard L. Bain (Ph.D., M.S, P.E., Chemical and Petroleum Refining Engineering, Colorado School of Mines)is a Group Manager and Principal Researcher at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) since February 1990, and has extensive experience in the thermal conversion of biomass, municipal wastes, coal, and petroleum. He leads the Thermochemical Process and Biorefinery Analysis Group in the National Bioenergy Center (NBC). He is the manager for NREL in-house research in the area of biomass thermochemical conversion; technical advisor to DOE on biomass demonstration projects; and coordinator of NREL efforts managing the DOE Small Modular Biopower Initiative. He has been a member of the International Energy Agency Biomass Gasification Working Group for 15 years. He has published more than 70 papers in energy conversion and has 10 patents in coal conversion, heavy oil processing and bioconversion.

"Emerging Bioenergy Technologies for Transportation Fuels"

Wednesday 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

Dr. Michael A. Pacheco joined the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in January of 2003 to serve as the Director of the National Bioenergy Center (NBC.) The NBC was established by the Secretary of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) in 2000 and is headquartered at NREL. As Center Director, Dr. Pacheco provides strategic guidance, technical direction, and management oversight of the NBC. In addition to line management responsibility at NREL, Dr. Pacheco is also responsible for coordinating bioenergy research activities supported by DOE and carried out at 5 DOE Laboratories: NREL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Idaho National Energy & Environmental Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory.

Dr. Pacheco joined NREL from Louisiana-Pacific Corp., where he served as Manager of Oriented Strand Board Technology and Product Quality and a Corporate Engineering Fellow for four years in Portland, Oregon. Before joining Louisiana-Pacific, Dr. Pacheco was a Vice President at Energy BioSystems Corp in Houston, Texas, where he led Process Development efforts to commercialize a bio-catalytic process for desulfurizing petroleum diesel and gasoline. Earlier, Dr. Pacheco held numerous supervisory positions in R&D during 16 years in the petrochemical industry, working for Amoco Oil Corp. and Conoco Oil Co. He earned a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, and a B.S. in chemical engineering from Clarkson University in Potsdam, N.Y.

“The Biofuels Opportunity: A Technologist’s Perspective”

Wednesday 1:30 PM-3:15 PM (Panel #1)

Dr. Liam E. Leightley is currently the Professor and Head of Department for the Department of

Forest Products, College of Forest Resources, Mississippi State University (MSU). Dr. Leightley serves on MSU’s energy committee which is charged with planning the creation of a Southern Energy Center at MSU. Dr. Leightley is also the Chairman for the Southern Alliance for the Utilization of Biomass Resources, Chairman for the North Mississippi Forest Products cluster, and he serves on the Mississippi Forestry Association Board of Directors. Prior to joining Mississippi State University, Dr. Leightley held global management positions for Rohm and Haas, a major manufacturer of specialty chemicals. He has also held positions as a visiting professor at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin and as research manager in the Queensland Department of Forestry in Australia. Dr. Leightley holds a Bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and microbiology from the University of Bradford and a Doctorate form University of Portsmouth, both in the United Kingdom. His research interests include technology transfer, utilization of woody biomass for the production of energy and chemicals, and marketing. Dr Leightley’s career interests have focused on planning and directing business development policies, as well as developing new marketing initiatives, assessing new markets and analyzing business opportunities.

Cal Mukumoto is the Forest Resource Director for Warm Springs Forest Products Industries. He is actively involved in the development of the Warm Springs Biomass Energy project. Cal is a member of the Indian Forest Management Assessment Team (IFMAT), a congressionally mandated team to review the status of Indian forestry. He also serves as a member of the board of directors for the Forest Stewardship Council, US. Cal currently serves on the forestry enterprise board for the Makah Indian Tribe and has served on boards for the Quinault Indian Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs. Cal is a Certified Forester of the Society of American Foresters. He received his Bachelor of Science from Humboldt State University and his MBA from the University of Washington.

“A Market Pathway to Forest Restoration”

Larry Mason serves as the Project Coordinator for the Rural Technology Initiative (RTI) www.ruraltech.org . In 2000, RTI was established by the United States Congress as a partnership between the University of Washington and Washington State University to aid in transfer of applied science and technology for managing forests for increased forest products and environmental values in support of rural forest-resource based communities. In 2002, RTI was selected to receive the National Non-Industrial Private Forest Education Award from the National Association of Professional Forestry Schools and Colleges (NAPFSC) and the National Woodland Owners Association (NWOA). Mr. Mason has a B.S. in Forest Management and an M.S. in Silviculture from the University of Washington.

“Forest Fuels Reductions and Biomass-to-Energy; Market and Non-Market Value Analysis Indicates Public Benefits are Underestimated”

Dr. Philip Steele has been a Professor in the Department of Forest Products, College of Forest Resources, Mississippi State University (MSU) for 17 years with both research and teaching duties. Dr. Steele is the coordinator of the MSU Bio-Oil Research Group and manager of the Bio-Oil Laboratory at MSU. He has directed the development of a unique auger-fed laboratory-scale bio-oil reactor. Based on development of the bio-oil reactor the Bio-Oil Research Group has attracted substantial funding from USDA and DOE grants to develop fuels and chemical products from bio-oil. The MSU Bio-Oil Research Group is comprised of on-campus collaborators in agricultural and biological engineering, chemistry, chemical engineering and forest products who are developing technology for the production of fuels and specialty chemicals from bio-oils made from various types of wood and agricultural feed stocks. Dr. Steele has won several research awards including the College of Forest Resources Outstanding Research Award and awards for exceptional research papers from both the Hardwood Research Council and the Forest Products Society. He has published widely and is the author or co-author of over 100 research papers.

“Current and Potential Markets for Pyrolysis Oils”

Wednesday 1:30 PM-3:15 PM (Panel #2)

Craig Rawlings currently is a Small Wood Enterprise Agent for Montana Community Development Corporation where he coordinates projects to help entrepreneurs develop new uses for small and underutilized wood supply resulting from hazardous fuels reduction on public and private lands. Mr. Rawlings has developed extensive public-private partnerships helping to implement new products and processes in timber companies. As a result of his efforts, he received two National Awards. In addition, Mr. Rawlings is presently the President and CEO of Safe Shop Tools, Inc. He has over 30 years experience in business ownership. Mr. Rawlings founded the Prodx Group, a consulting firm providing assistance with industrial marketing, product development, and business planning. Mr. Rawlings volunteers for S.C.O.R.E., where he works with entrepreneurs, most often helping them to identify funding sources and market opportunities. He has also served on the Montana Small Business Development Center (SBDC) Advisory Council and is a member of the American Trucking Association, Maintenance Council, S5 Task Force, Montana Wood Products Association, Intermountain Roundwood Association and is Secretary of the Montana Logging Association.

Richard Dodge was raised on a diary in Troutlake, WA. In the late 1960s Richard had begun brush piling in the local area. The business expanded and by the late 1980s, they owned and ran five contract logging sides, mainly in the Mt. Hood area. In 1992, Richard and his wife Janie constructed Boardman Chip Co. next to the Columbia River in Boardman, OR and later took over an adjacent chip barge reload. In 1993, he acquired Blue Mountain Lumber Products, a random length dimension mill in Pendleton, OR. The family business currently employs 130-150 people, depending on the season. In line with Richard’s desire to obtain the most value from each log harvested, he is currently upgrading the Boardman Chip Co. with a modified single-pass sawline, helped by a grant from the U.S. Forest Service biomass grant program, and just finished construction of a pellet mill on the Blue Mountain Lumber Co. site. Richard and Janie have also been successful bidders on several U.S. Forest Service stewardship contracts in Northeast Oregon.

“Integrated Harvesting and Utilization of Small Diameter Timber

Ron Taylor*

“Traditional Navajo Hogans Constructed of Small Diameter Timber”

Brett KenCairn is the founding director of the Rogue Institute for Ecology. The Institute was an early pioneer in launching forest product certification programs, ecosystem restoration training for displaced forest workers, and it helped catalyze a variety of multi-stakeholder collaborations including the Applegate Partnership and the Collaborative Learning Circle and the Lakeview ( Oregon) Forest Sustainability Initiative. Brett also served as the first Executive Director for the Grand Canyon Forest Foundation. For five years Brett served as director for Indigenous Community Enterprises which was established to find economic development opportunities in Native communities utilizing forest restoration by-products. During this period, ICE established a $1.5 million manufacturing facility to process small diameter roundwood now called Southwest Traditional Log Homes. Brett currently serves as director of Community Energy. Community Energy specializes in the development of small-scale biomass and other community-based power production systems. He is also a partner in Restoration Technologies Group, a consortium of specialists working with communities to establish integrated forest products utilization partnerships.

“Biomass Opportunities for Rural and Tribal Forest-based Communities”

Wednesday 1:30 PM-3:15 PM (Panel #3)

Timothy Maker is Executive Director of the Biomass Energy Resource Center. He also serves as the technical director of the organization and has been intimately involved in the development of all of BERC’s projects and program initiatives. He is a nationally recognized leader in the fields of biomass heating and CHP applications for community uses and public schools. Prior to joining BERC at its founding in 2001, Mr. Maker was for 15 years principal of EEA Biomass, a consulting firm that specialized in wood heating for schools, public buildings and community district energy. He is the author of two books on these subjects. Mr. Maker has worked in the energy field for 24 years. He is a member of the Fuels for Schools Implementation Team, a member of the National Biomass Energy Team and is a frequent presenter at national conferences. He holds a BS in Engineering Physics from Cornell University.

Rick Cables*

“Aquila Co-Fire Project ( Colorado)”

Linda Anania serves as the Deputy State Director of Resources and Fire in the Colorado State Office. She took the position in March 2003, after serving 10 years as the Field Office Manager in Kremmling, Colorado. Before working in Kremmling, Anania worked as Acting District Ranger, at the Lassen National Forest in northern California. Anania’s forestry career started, in 1976, with I.P. Lumber Company of Dawson, Oregon. Later she chose a career in public land management at the Alsea Ranger District working in timber sale planning and with a brush disposal crew. Anania worked 17 years for the Forest Service in various locations and positions including: Land Use Planner/Analyst, Suislaw National Forest, Oregon; Resource Forester, Sisters Ranger District, Oregon; Assistant Resource Officer, LaPorte Ranger District, California; Assistant Recreation Staff and Timber Planner, Plumas National Forest, California; Timber Management Officer, Beckworth Ranger District, California. Anania grew up in Berkeley, California and spent summers working on ranches and farms in eastern Oregon. She completed her undergraduate work at Southern Oregon College in Public Administration and Economics, and her graduate work at Oregon State University in Forest and Watershed Planning.

“Aquila Co-Fire Project ( Colorado)”

John M. Irving is the Manager of Power Supply for the Burlington Electric Department in Burlington, Vermont. His responsibilities include being the Plant Manager for the McNeil Generating Station. McNeil is a 50 MW wood, gas and oil fired generating station utilizing a conventional boiler and steam turbine that has been operating commercially since June 1, 1984. McNeil Station was also the host facility for the Vermont Gasification Project. Prior to joining Burlington Electric, Mr. Irving was employed by C.T. Main Inc., a major architect-engineering firm in Boston. He has over 32 years of experience in the design, construction, startup and operation of generating facilities fueled with coal, wood, natural gas, oil and red liquor. Mr. Irving's most recent responsibilities at C.T. Main included serving as Project Engineer, Mechanical Construction Engineer, and Start-up Engineer at the McNeil Station. Mr. Irving received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maine and is a Registered Professional Engineer in Maine and Vermont.

“McNeil Generating Station ( Vermont)”

Scott Brown is the CEO and a founder of New Energy Capital Corporation, a New England-based company with investments in biofuels, renewable power generation, and on-site cogeneration assets. Mr. Brown was a member of the founding management team of First Solar, Inc., and later the President of Glasstech Solar, Inc. During his tenure as CEO, Glasstech Solar established two world records for solar cell efficiency, installed PV manufacturing facilities in India, Japan, Italy, and Germany, and created the first continuous process solid substrate PV manufacturing technology. Mr. Brown has consulted with private equity firms and state governments regarding the development of the renewables market, and has led investments in the biofuels, biomass, and solar markets. He is a member of the National Advisory Board of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. New Energy Capital Corporation investments include a biodiesel production plant in Delaware, two ethanol production facilities in the eastern cornbelt, three cogeneration projects in California and Massachusetts, and a biomass power plant in Maine.

“Greenville Steam Company”

Scott Haase is a Renewable Resources Specialist in DOI’s Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development - Division of Energy and Mineral Development. He has 15 years experience working in the fields of natural resource management, biomass energy, and renewable energy planning and analysis. He is presently working on several biomass heating and power projects in California, Colorado, Minnesota, Montana and Washington. Scott has an M.S. in Technology and Human Affairs from Washington University in St. Louis, and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Vermont.

“Aquila Co-Fire Project ( Colorado)”

Wednesday 3:45 PM-5:30 PM (Panel #4)

Tad Mason has 25 years of experience in natural resources management. He joined TSS Consultants in 2000 and since that time has implemented forest fuels management projects, biomass market and utilization feasibility assessments, forest management plans, and conducted applied research for a variety of clients. Clients served range from public sector agencies, to private sector businesses, Tribal enterprises, public utilities and non-profit organizations. As a principal at TSS, he has managed projects in California, Arizona, Washington, Idaho and Oregon focused on wildland fuels reduction, forest management, biomass utilization and bioenergy project development. Prior to joining TSS, he served as Manager of Wood Fuel Supply for Pacific Energy/Pacific Wood Fuels Company where he coordinated biomass fuel procurement activities in support of four biomass-fired power plants in Northern California. As a Registered Professional Forester (RPF), he has prepared plans for timber harvests, timber management, fuels treatment, and fire restoration. Mr. Mason received his B.S. degree in Forestry from the University of California at Berkeley in 1979. He is an active member of the Northern California Society of American Foresters and the California Licensed Foresters Association. Tad currently serves on the Western Governors Association Biomass Task Force and the Oregon Forest Biomass Work Group.

Developing Commercial Scale Bioenergy Projects – Some Steps to Consider”

Ravi Malhotra is the Executive Director of ICAST, a Golden, Colorado based non-profit he founded in July 2002. ICAST promotes sustainable economic development for underserved communities by creating enterprises that utilize local resources such as biomass and markets for the products such as space heating using biomass. Mr. Malhotra has established sustainable enterprises in Asia, Africa, and America that currently provide employment to hundreds of residents in local communities. He has successfully led numerous community development projects in the field of renewable energy, affordable housing, sustainable agriculture and water treatment. Mr. Malhotra has been responsible for the R&D efforts to develop appropriate technologies that have received numerous awards for their design and performance. He has over 18 years of experience working in various positions of responsibility in small entrepreneurial firms, including two of his own. Mr. Malhotra has a B.S. in Engineering from IIT-Delhi, India and a M.S in Engineering and MBA from the University of Texas at Austin. He serves on the Western Governor Associations Solar and Bio-Energy Task Forces, is a member of EPA’s P3 partnership and is a faculty member at Colorado State University’s Forestry Department.

“Developing Community Scale Bioenergy Projects”

Peter Luchetti is CEO of GFP Advisors and GFP Broker-Dealer Inc., which he founded in June 2002. GFP Advisors is a boutique investment banking firm, whose principals have global experience in structured and project finance in the energy, power, communications and infrastructure sectors. Target clients include large public and private companies, quasi-governmental entities (e.g., regulated utilities and state-owned enterprises), strategic and private equity investors. From 1994 to December 2000, Mr. Luchetti was Managing Director and Global Head of Project & Structured Finance for Banc America Securities LLC.  In this role he was responsible for managing a 140-person team working in 40 countries on the origination and execution of project and structured finance advisory and capital raising roles. The team was a global leader in the industry under Mr. Luchetti’s leadership, ranking in the top three in underwriting and advisory roles and reaching first place in three of five years. Prior to taking responsibility for the Global Project & Structured Finance, Mr. Luchetti spent three years running distressed loan trading for Banc America Securities and eight years as Global Head of Derivatives. Prior to joining Bank of America, Mr. Luchetti spent four years at J. Aron – Goldman Sachs. Mr. Luchetti received his BA in economics from Hobart & William Smith Colleges and an MA in economics from Duke University.

“Overview of the Biomass Financing Model: Financing Requirements & Capital Markets Potential”

Wednesday 3:45 PM-5:30 PM (Panel #5)

Richard Nelson is currently director of Engineering Extension Programs with the College of Engineering at Kansas State University. In addition, he is principal of Enersol Resources, a private renewable energy assessment and environmental analysis consulting firm. His educational outreach and applied research activities focus on energetic, environmental, and sustainability aspects associated with biomass resource assessment, production, and utilization for both liquid fuel and electricity production. Richard holds degrees in engineering from Oklahoma State University.

“ Potential Water Quality Improvement from Herbaceous Energy Crop Production and Use as a Co-firing Fuel to Meet Various RPS Requirements in Kansas”

Scott Haase is a Renewable Resources Specialist in DOI’s Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development - Division of Energy and Mineral Development. He has 15 years experience working in the fields of natural resource management, biomass energy, and renewable energy planning and analysis. He is presently working on several biomass heating and power projects in California, Colorado, Minnesota, Montana and Washington. Scott has an M.S. in Technology and Human Affairs from Washington University in St. Louis, and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Vermont.

“Co-firing Coal and Forest Biomass in Colorado: Bridging the Cost Gap Through Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs)”

Dr. Marcia Patton-Mallory currently works in the office of the Chief, USDA Forest Service, as the Biomass and Bio-energy Coordinator. Previous to this assignment, she was the Director of the Rocky Mountain Research Station of the USDA Forest Service, in Fort Collins, CO for five years, and Assistant Station Director for 10 years. Additional assignments with the USDA Forest Service include a Research Staff Specialists in the Washington Office and a Research Engineer at the Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, WI. Marcia’s technical training includes a B.S. in Wood Science and Technology from the College of Forestry and Natural Resources at Colorado State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the College of Engineering at Colorado State University. Special assignments include a Science and Technology Fellow, assigned to the U.S. Senate.

“Community Ties to Sustainability through Bio-based Products and Bioenergy”

Ernest Shea is the President of Natural Resource Solutions LLC, a conservation planning and consulting firm that helps clients craft solutions to complex natural resource challenges. Ernie has over 25 years of experience at the national, state and local level where he has worked in partnership with government agencies, agricultural and conservation organizations and business leaders helping landowners and managers conserve, protect and ensure the orderly development of the nation’s natural resources. Early in his career, Shea served as Maryland’s Assistant Secretary of Agriculture for Agricultural Development and Resource Conservation. From 1986-2004 Shea served as Chief Executive Officer of the National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD). Shea is currently facilitating the 25 x ’25 renewable energy initiative through which farmers, ranchers, forest landowners and related stakeholders are working to advance new energy solutions from America’s working lands.

25 x 25 Initiative”

Wednesday 3:45 PM-5:30 PM (Panel #6)

Edmund A. Gee is currently the National Partnership Coordinator, Forest and Rangelands for the National Forest System. He is also the National Woody Biomass Utilization Team Leader and has held the previous position of Deputy Forest Supervisor, Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, USDA-Forest Service. Mr. Gee has over 28 years of forestry experience in fire and fuels management, timber and silviculture management, planning, and as a professional. He has worked in the Pacific Southwest Region on the Sequoia and Plumas National Forests and Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, while in the Pacific Northwest Region Mr. Gee worked on the Okanogan, Willamette and Siskiyou National Forests. Mr. Gee has also worked in Washington D.C. for International Forestry and is a multi-cultural member of Chief and Staff. He has a B.S. in Natural Resource Management from UC Berkeley, graduate work in Silviculture and Fire Ecology at the University of Washington, and is currently working on MBA in International Business at the University of Phoenix. Edmund is happily married with two daughters.

Steve Jolley is a professional forester employed by Wheelabrator Shasta Energy Company to procure fuel for 50 megawatt Anderson based wood-fired power plants. He works to supply the facilities with fuel via forest, sawmill, agriculture and urban sources. He is a strong advocate for forest thinning as a precursor to prescribed fire and has collaborated on many agency/private party-thinning projects in California. Previously, Steve worked for Weyerhaeuser Co., Paul Bunyan Lumber Co., and Simpson Timber Company. During the mid-to-late 80's he worked for Roseburg Resources Company developing a thinning program on company lands that ultimately produced in excess of 200,000 bone dry tons of biomass fuel per year for six separate power plants covering 10-15 thousand acres per year. Born, raised and educated in Indiana, he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Forest Management from Purdue University in 1973.

“Locating and Procuring Woody Biomass Fuel for 50 MW Biomass Fueled Power Plants”

Catherine M. Mater is the President of Mater Engineering, Ltd and a Senior Fellow at The Pinchot Institute for Conservation. Catherine Mater has over 30 years of research and design experience working in the forest industry to evaluate value-added product development potential from woody biomass and residual fiber. During the last decade, she has served on two Presidential panels to evaluate forest industry harvest and manufacturing options, and economic ramifications for US manufacturers. She currently heads the US Forest Service’s first pilot project in Coordinated Resource Offering Protocol (CROP) to help levelize biomass supply within ecological landscapes across multiple public and private forestland ownerships. The seven CROP pilot projects are located in 14 states across the US and encompass 24 National Forests (75 ranger districts), 27 BLM field offices, 37 state agencies, 24 Indian Nations, and over 135 city and county jurisdictions. Initiated in 2006 – all seven CROP pilots are scheduled for completion this year. She has just been appointed by the Secretary of the US Department of Agriculture to serve on the Forestry Research Advisory Council for the US. Mater holds a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science and a Master's Degree in Civil Engineering, both from Oregon State University.

“Coordinated Resource Offering Protocol (CROP) -Biomass Resource Model”

Robert Davis is currently thePresident of Forest Energy Corporation, a pellet manufacturer in Show Low, AZ founded 1991.He is a member of Future Forest, LLC, which is the prime contractor for the White Mountain Stewardship Project in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest. The project is a 150,000 acre, ten year forest restoration, and fire mitigation project. Mr. Davis has a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of New Mexico. Rob is also a member of the AZ Governor’s Forest Health Oversight Council,Southwest Sustainable Forest Partnership Steering Committee,AZ IOF Board of Directors,WGA Biomass Task Force,25 x ’25 Forestry Working Group, and the past President / Director of the Pellet Fuels Institute.

Thursday 8:00 AM

Joseph A. Duda has 29 years of professional forestry experience. He joined the Colorado State Forest Service in 2001 and serves as the Forest Management Division Supervisor. Joe leads the Colorado Wood Utilization and Marketing Assistance Program. In 2004 he completed an assignment with State and Private Forestry for the U.S. Forest Service in Alaska. Joe’s experience prior to joining the Colorado State Forest Service included serving as a resource manager for a forest products company. He has worked closely with US Forest Service Land Management Planning since 1981 and has extensive knowledge of laws and policies related to forest/land management, US Forest Service contracts, and endangered species. Joe also serves on the Bureau of Land Management Front Range Resource Advisory Council. Throughout his career Joe has actively participated in professional and community organizations. He has held leadership positions with the Society of American Foresters, Colorado Timber Industry Association, Boy Scouts of America, and local church boards. He has been elected to public positions, and chaired the Del Norte School District Accountability Committee. He has a BS in Forestry from Michigan Technological University.

Thursday 8:10 AM-9:30 AM

Rick Handley is the director of regional energy programs for the CONEG Policy Research Center. Mr. Handley joined the Center in 1993 as program manager for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) and continues to serve as the NRBP’s director. Prior to joining the Center Mr. Handley was a program manager with the New York State Energy Office, and has over 25 years experience in energy efficiency and renewable energy. The Center and the NRBP have provided technical support and objective and reliable information to the region’s states in their efforts to incorporate bioenergy technology into state climate change, electric utility restructuring, energy supply issues, economic development, and forest and land-use planning. Under Mr. Handley’s guidance the NRBP has been active in attempting to build markets and encourage regional production of ethanol, biodiesel, and other biomass derived liquid transportation fuels as well as encouraging research and demonstration for biodiesel in heating and other non transportation use. Mr. Handley currently directs an eleven-state, U.S. DOE funded, effort in partnership with the emerging bio-products industry to expand the use environmentally preferable and domestically produced bio-based products. In 2003, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Mr. Handley led a team to reorganize the five regional biomass programs to create the National Biomass State and Regional Partnership. Rick Handley is a summa cum laude graduate of the State University of New York College of Technology. He is a past member of the board of directors and treasure of the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association, and the Biomass Energy Resource Center Inc.

John Heissenbuttel is Vice President, Forestry & Wood Products Division of the American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA). John joined the American Forest and Paper Association in 1988. He is currently responsible for managing the association's Forest Resources Group, Wood Products International Department and the American Wood Council. In this role he is responsible for identifying and pursuing issue priorities, strategic goals, and imperatives for ensuring fiber supply and access to wood product markets for member companies. John is known for providing the staff leadership to create and implement AF&PA's Sustainable Forestry Initiative® program.Prior to joining AF&PA, John worked for American Forest Products Company in California for 11 years in a range of forest management and forest policy positions.John is a 1976 graduate from Humboldt State University with B.S. in Forest Management.John is the Past President of the Society of American Foresters, a 16,000-member organization of professional foresters in the United States.

James Walls*

Andrew A. Merritt is the State Director for United States Senator Wayne Allard, where he is responsible for managing the state staff in Colorado and advising the Senator on a range of policy issues that impact Colorado. A graduate of the United States Military Academy with a degree in economics, Andrew served around the world in various assignments including Germany, the Republic of Korea and the Continental United States. Further, he served on two joint task force missions responsible for drug interdiction on the West Coast. He has also worked as a registered investment representative and a financial planner, advising individuals and businesses on investment decisions, budgeting, employee benefits, and estate planning. During his nearly 12 year career in the public policy arena, Andrew has worked in various capacities for two United States Senators, and was a manager on a Congressional Campaign. Most recently he has been involved with Senator Allard’s work as founder and chairman of the Senate Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Caucus and Senator Allard’s public lands legislation to include a Good Samaritan abandoned mine cleanup bill, various wilderness bills, an Endangered Species Act reform bill, and efforts to address the health of our forests.

David Hiller serves as State Issues Counsel for U.S. Senator Ken Salazar, working out of the Senator’s Colorado headquarters in Denver. A graduate of the University of Michigan Law School, David has practiced law in the U.S. Department of Interior Solicitor’s Office and at the private law firms of Davis, Graham & Stubbs and Don, Hiller & Galleher, P.C., in Denver. David served as Policy Director of Senator Salazar’s 2004 Senate campaign. Now, as State Issues Counsel, David works closely with the Senator’s Washington, D.C. legislative staff and with Colorado constituents and organizations on a range of policy issues, including energy, natural resources, environmental concerns, transportation and telecommunications.

Todd Schulke is the forest program director for the Center for Biological Diversity. He has been involved forest protection and restoration in the Southwest for 15 years. He sits on the Western Governor’s Forest Health Advisory Committee, Arizona Governor Napolitano’s Forest Health Oversite Committee, Senator Bingaman’s Collaborative Forest Restoration Program Advisory Committee, and the New Mexico Forest & Watershed Health Planning Committee. He is on the board of directors of the Center for Biological Diversity, American Lands Alliance, and New Mexico Wilderness Alliance. He also oversees on-the-ground forest restoration projects on 3 national forests in the Southwest and is on the board of Gila WoodNet a community-based forestry group dedicated to ecologically sound forest restoration prescriptions, implementation techniques, and utilization of restoration by-products. He lives with his wife and 2 young sons in a fire prone ponderosa pine forest on the Gila National Forest in southwestern New Mexico.

Thursday 9:45 AM-11:30 AM

Al Sample has served as President of the Pinchot Institute for Conservation in Washington, DC since 1995.  He is a Fellow of the Society of American Foresters, and a Research Affiliate on the faculty at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.  He is author of numerous research papers, articles and books on topics in national and international forest policy. His most recent book is Forest Conservation Policy, with Antony Cheng, published in 2004. Sample earned his doctorate in resource policy and economics from Yale University (1989).  He also holds an MBA and a Master of Forestry from Yale, and a Bachelor of Science in forest resource management from the University of Montana.  His professional experience spans public, private, and non-profit organizations, including the U.S. Forest Service, Champion International, The Wilderness Society, and the Prince of Thurn und Taxis in Bavaria, Germany.  He specialized in resource economics and forest policy as a Senior Fellow at the Conservation Foundation in Washington, DC, and later as Vice President for Research at the American Forestry Association.  Sample has served on numerous national task forces and commissions, including the President's Commission on Environmental Quality task force on biodiversity on private lands, and as co-chair of the National Commission on Science for Sustainable Forestry.  Other professional activities include serving as Chair of the National Capital Society of American Foresters, and as Chair of the board of directors for the Forest Stewards Guild.

Frank Stewart is a California Licensed Forester and serves as Counties’ QLG Forester. He has served eight years as County Forester for Lassen, Plumas, Shasta, Sierra and Tehama Counties in the Herger-Feinstein Quincy Library Group Forest Recovery Act - Pilot Project. His experience includes thirty-three years of land management and log procurement for Collins Pine Company, Erickson Lumber Company and Diamond Match Company. He is a graduate of Humboldt State University with a B.S. in Forest Management. Mr. Stewart is a member of the Steering Committee for the Quincy Library Group, Board of Director’s for the California Fire Safe Council, Board of Director’s for the Plumas County Fire Safe Council, Plumas County and Sierra County Resource Advisory Committees (RAC), and Board of Director’s for the Sierra Cascade Logging Conference. Mr. Stewart has been married for 40 years to an elementary school teacher and is the proud father of two sons and a daughter. He is also a U.S. Marine Corps veteran.

“A Cohesive Strategy for Fire Protection, Forest Restoration and Economic Stability”

Rob Rizzo serves as the Director of Facilities Administration at Mount Wachusett Community College in Gardner, Massachusetts. Previous to this assignment, Rob served as the Associate Director of the Forest & Wood Products Institute at the College. A component of Rob's current work includes the development and implementation of a renewable energy technology transfer program. In this effort, he has recently developed three renewable energy courses that are currently available to college students. Rob participated in the College’s successful efforts to convert the campus from an all-electric system to a closed loop hydronic heating system utilizing woody biomass as the feedstock. The project offsets 3.3 M kWh of electricity with savings to the College of $300,000 per year, and has reduced the College’s greenhouse gas emissions by over 18.6% in three years. Rob is also the Project Manager for the College’s 1.3 million dollar research and development biomass gasification project. This 50 kilowatt combined heat and power project will demonstrate a pre-commercial biomass gasification technology for heat, electricity and air conditioning. In another research project, Rob is coordinating the College’s efforts to burn a B20 blend of biodiesel in an existing fuel oil boiler, conduct emission profiles for both biodiesel and conventional heating oil, and then compare the emission characteristics of each fuel. In addition, Rob manages the College’s other renewable and sustainable energy efforts. He purchased and installed a 50 meter wind meteorological tower to assess the wind resource on campus and is directing the College’s $2 million wind turbine project which will lead to the construction of a 1.5 megawatt wind turbine.

“ Mount Wachusett Community College: The Role of Biomass in Education, Sustainability and Energy Security”

Catherine M. Mater is the President of Mater Engineering, Ltd and a Senior Fellow at The Pinchot Institute for Conservation. Catherine Mater has over 30 years of research and design experience working in the forest industry to evaluate value-added product development potential from woody biomass and residual fiber. During the last decade, she has served on two Presidential panels to evaluate forest industry harvest and manufacturing options, and economic ramifications for US manufacturers. She currently heads the US Forest Service’s first pilot project in Coordinated Resource Offering Protocol (CROP) to help levelize biomass supply within ecological landscapes across multiple public and private forestland ownerships. The seven CROP pilot projects are located in 14 states across the US and encompass 24 National Forests (75 ranger districts), 27 BLM field offices, 37 state agencies, 24 Indian Nations, and over 135 city and county jurisdictions. Initiated in 2006 – all seven CROP pilots are scheduled for completion this year. She has just been appointed by the Secretary of the US Department of Agriculture to serve on the Forestry Research Advisory Council for the US. Mater holds a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science and a Master's Degree in Civil Engineering, both from Oregon State University.

Angela Farr is the Biomass Utilization Coordinator for Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, and administers Montana’s Fuels for Schools program. She is currently administering over $1.2 million in grants to help build five new biomass heating systems around the state, from small-scale, pellet-fired systems to a 13 million BTU boiler system for the University of Montana-Western campus in Dillon. Angela graduated magna cum laude from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, and received an M.S. in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana. Her diverse career has included work on several National Forests, in the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and in State & Private Forestry in the Northern and Intermountain Regions. As part of the Fuels for Schools Implementation Team, Angela was honored to receive the Chief’s Award for External Technology Transfer in 2005.

Thursday 11:30 AM

Bill Wilson was a National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD) officer for four years before being elected President. His experience at NACD goes back to 1994 when he was elected to represent Oklahoma on the NACD Council and later on the NACD Board of Directors. He was elected president of the Oklahoma Association of Conservation Districts in 1994. He has served as a district official for the Haskell County Conservation District since 1980. Wilson is a founder and president of the National Watershed Coalition. He owns and operates a 650-acre cow/calf, horse and mule ranch in East Central Oklahoma. He is also a registered land surveyor in Oklahoma and Arkansas . He has worked many years to restore Dust Bowl era farm fields into productive pasture land. Conservation practices include grazing and nutrient management, tree planting, erosion control drainage structures, cross fencing, and sediment collection structures to improve water quality.

Pam Inmann is Executive Director of the Western Governors' Association. She became the Executive Director of the Western Governors' Association in March 2004. Ms. Inmann previously worked as the District Director in State Government Affairs at Altria Corporate Services. Altria is the parent company of Philip Morris USA and Kraft Foods, Inc. As District Director, Ms. Inmann had responsibility for fifteen western states with three regional directors reporting to her. Prior to joining Altria, Ms. Inmann worked for ten years for the Rocky Mountain Oil and Gas Association. At RMOGA she served as Director of Special Projects and Director of the Committee on Oil Shale. Her other experience includes public affairs manager at Cyprus-Amoco Minerals' Hansen Project and assistant coordinator and consultant to the Colorado Governor's office. Ms. Inmann sat on the foundation board of the National Conference of State Legislators and was former President of the Colorado Public Expenditure Council. She is a graduate of the University of Colorado in Boulder in 1975 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science.

Jeff Jahnke has worked in state natural resource management for more than 34 years, primarily in Montana and Alaska and now Colorado. Presently, Mr. Jahnke is State Forester for the Colorado State Forest service. Mr. Jahnke is experienced in many state resource management programs to include fire management, state and private cooperative forestry and the management of state forested lands. He has been involved in fire management and suppression since 1969. Mr. Jahnke served in many fire overhead positions beginning with initial attack and culminating in service on several National Type I fire teams as Operations Section Chief and Deputy Incident Commander. Mr. Jahnke currently serves as Chairman of the National Association of State Foresters Forest Fire Protection committee. He has a B.S. in Forestry from Michigan Technological University and a M.S. in Forest and Range Management from Washington State University.

Thursday 1:00 PM- 5:00 PM (Breakout Sessions)

Gayle Gordon is a senior natural resource policy advisor and manager of the Western Governors’ Association’s (WGA) Biomass Program. Before joining WGA in June, 2005, Gayle was the Bureau of Land Management’s National Program Liaison, working to increase understanding and cooperation between BLM and external organizations. Other positions she held in BLM include State Director, managing BLM programs in the 31 states east of and bordering on the Mississippi River; and Assistant Director for Information Resources Management, the Bureau’s Chief Information Officer. Previously, Gayle had been the Department of the Interior’s senior information resources and technology manager and held senior technology management positions at the U.S. Geological Survey. Gayle holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and Economics from the University of Wisconsin, a Master of Science degree in Technology of Management from the American University, and Master and Doctoral degrees in Public Administration from the University of Southern California.

Jacob Fey is the Director of the Washington State University (WSU) Extension Energy Program. Fey has 30 years of experience directing and implementing conservation in our region, serving in management roles for the Washington State Energy Office, the City of Tacoma, and on many boards. At Tacoma Power, Fey oversaw the development and implementation of a comprehensive conservation program for new and existing residential, commercial and industrial facilities resulting in the acquisition of 40 average megawatts at a cost of approximately $120 million. Fey served as President of the Electric League, Chair of the Board of the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance and Chair of the Tacoma Public Utilities Board. He is currently a member of the Tacoma, WA City Council. Fey has a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Washington and a Master of Public Administration from the University of Puget Sound.

Frederic Kuzel has worked at the Council of Great Lakes Governors since December 1988. He has served as the Director of the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) since joining the Council. Prior to that, he managed grant programs at several city and regional planning agencies in Illinois. He has a B.A. in Geography from Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin and an M.S. in Urban Geography and Planning from Northern Illinois University. In his capacity as GLBSRP Director, Fred has had the opportunity to speak on a variety of biomass energy issues at numerous state, regional and national conferences.

Phillip Badger is President of Renewable Oil International® LLC and ROI Alabama Operations LLC. He formerly worked for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) where he led fuel ethanol research programs for five years—including construction of a 10 gallon per hour fuel ethanol plant—and managed the U.S. Department of Energy’s 13-state Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP) for 15 years. Projects managed under the SERBEP program covered biomass resources studies, feasibility studies, feedstock and technology applied R&D, environmental and economic studies, and information transfer activities. Prior to TVA, Mr. Badger had research and extension responsibilities at Ohio State University in the fields of renewable energy and controlled environment agriculture. Mr. Badger has a B.S. and M.Sc. in Agricultural Engineering from the Ohio State University, an MBA from Vanderbilt University, and is a registered professional engineer in Ohio and Alabama. He serves on the boards of the Biomass Energy Research Association (BERA) and the New Uses Council (the trade association for the bioenergy and biobased products industries). He is also a member of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers, American Solar Energy Society, International Solar Energy Society, Association for the Advancement of Industrial Crops, Council on Forest Engineering, and Council for Agricultural Science and Technology.

Rick Handley is the director of regional energy programs for the CONEG Policy Research Center. Mr. Handley joined the Center in 1993 as program manager for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) and continues to serve as the NRBP’s director. Prior to joining the Center Mr. Handley was a program manager with the New York State Energy Office, and has over 25 years experience in energy efficiency and renewable energy. The Center and the NRBP have provided technical support and objective and reliable information to the region’s states in their efforts to incorporate bioenergy technology into state climate change, electric utility restructuring, energy supply issues, economic development, and forest and land-use planning. Under Mr. Handley’s guidance the NRBP has been active in attempting to build markets and encourage regional production of ethanol, biodiesel, and other biomass derived liquid transportation fuels as well as encouraging research and demonstration for biodiesel in heating and other non transportation use. Mr. Handley currently directs an eleven-state, U.S. DOE funded, effort in partnership with the emerging bio-products industry to expand the use environmentally preferable and domestically produced bio-based products. In 2003, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Mr. Handley led a team to reorganize the five regional biomass programs to create the National Biomass State and Regional Partnership. Rick Handley is a summa cum laude graduate of the State University of New York College of Technology. He is a past member of the board of directors and treasure of the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association, and the Biomass Energy Resource Center Inc.

* biography unavailable at time of printing